Melon Salmonella Lawyer: Pre-Cut Melon Salmonella Outbreak Continues to Grow

Home / Blog / Melon Salmonella Lawyer: Pre-Cut Melon Salmonella Outbreak Continues to Grow

Melon Salmonella Lawyer: Pre-Cut Melon Salmonella Outbreak Continues to Grow

Melon Salmonella Lawsuit
  • Tony Coveny | Apr 29, 2019

Melon Salmonella Lawyer: Pre-Cut Melon Salmonella

Pathogens are ubiquitous. They’re in every field, on every iPhone, and even in your intestines. Foodborne pathogens easily contaminate foods like melons and cause illnesses like Salmonellosis.

Mishandling food (temperature, time, cleanliness) creates opportunities for bacterial growth. Ideal conditions for bacterial growth vary based on the species of bacteria. Factors including acidity, temperature, generation time, oxygen (anaerobic vs. aerobic), and moisture levels all play a role in a bacteria’s ability to survive.  Processing and packaging play significant roles in reducing microbial counts in food products, but some food items still have intrinsic characteristics making them prone to contamination, like Salmonella in raw chicken.

Mishandling fresh produce heightens the risk of contaminating the product and causing foodborne illnesses. Ready-to-eat produce (i.e., pre-cut melon) risks potential contamination because these items are typically minimally processed and consumed raw.

Pathogens like Salmonella easily contaminate products like melons because the pre-cut melon slices are minimally processed and then packaged. Salmonella needs ample resources like water, so melons are the perfect environment for Salmonella. Also, Salmonella is a facultative anaerobic organism (meaning it doesn’t require oxygen to grow), so sealed packaging does not inhibit Salmonella’s growth.

How Do You Safely Prepare Melons?

  • Upon returning home with your purchased fresh fruit and vegetables, you should make sure to store items away from items capable of carrying pathogens like raw meats, poultry, and fish. I keep my raw poultry and fish in the bottom drawer of my refrigerator, so there is less of a chance of juices from the raw meats dripping on and contaminating my fresh produce.
  • Wash your melons before cutting into them. This will hopefully reduce the transfer of bacteria from the outer rind of the melon onto the inner fruit of the melon.
  • Eat immediately or store in the refrigerator within 2 hours.

For more information about a Melon Salmonella lawsuit, or to speak to a Melon Salmonella Lawyer, call 1-888-335-4901.

 

CNN
NBC logo
CBS logo
abc-logo
inside edition
Logo of C-SPAN
Fox-news-logo
Telemundo