Tahini Salmonella Lawsuit: Tahini Salmonella Lawyer Update on Brodt Zenatti Holdings LLC Recall

Home / Blog / Tahini Salmonella Lawsuit: Tahini Salmonella Lawyer Update on Brodt Zenatti Holdings LLC Recall

Tahini Salmonella Lawsuit: Tahini Salmonella Lawyer Update on Brodt Zenatti Holdings LLC Recall

Tahini Salmonella Lawsuit
  • Tony Coveny | May 20, 2019

Tahini Salmonella Lawsuit: Tahini Salmonella Lawyer Update Recall of Contaminated Tahini 

Tahini that may be contaminated with salmonella was originally recalled on May 14 by Brodt Zenatti Holdings LLC. Just three days later, the company has expanded it recall to include all tahini products imported before December 2018 and through April 2019, when they ceased shipping the potentially contaminated tahini products. Four people have become ill after eating the tahini, with one being hospitalized.

Retail and bulk packages of Karawan brand tahini, sold in 16-ounce jars and 39-pound buckets, were included in the original recall. On May 17, Brodt Zenatti Holdings LLC, based in Jupiter, Florida, expanded that recall to include all tahini products. Tahini that may be contaminated with salmonella may also be sold under the brand names El-Karawan and Halva. In addition, other companies may have imported Karawan Tahini and Halva brand tahini.

Consumers are being warned by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to not consume any tahini labeled as either Karawan Tahini or El-Karawan Tahini. The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene performed tests on samples of Karawan brand tahini and two of those samples returned positive results for the presence of salmonella.

Potentially contaminated tahini was distributed to retailers, restaurants, and directly to consumers through online sales and at retail locations. The sample that tested positive for salmonella did not have lot codes or identifying information about the shipment date. Tahini has a shelf life of two years and may still be in consumers’ homes even after the recall.

Tahini is made from sesame seeds and is often used in other food products, particularly in restaurants. It can be served on its own or used as an ingredient in Mediterranean and Middle Eastern style dishes, such as hummus, falafel, and baba ganoush.

The FDA and state health officials are continuing their investigation into the salmonella contamination of imported tahini, in an attempt to identify the specific source.

For more information about a Tahini Salmonella Lawsuit or to speak to a Tahini Salmonella Lawyer, call 1-888-335-4901.