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E. coli Lawsuit Lawyer: E. coli outbreak numbers increase to 156 ill in 10 states

The e. coli outbreak that began in March 2019 continues to spread, affecting more people in more states. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has identified a potential link in raw ground beef products recently recalled by K2D Foods but warn that it has not made a positive identification of the source of the multi-state outbreak. In addition, the FDA notes, there may be other ground beef products responsible for the illnesses.

As of April 23, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is reporting a total of 156 illnesses, including 20 hospitalizations, across 10 states. State now impacted by the e. coli outbreak include Kentucky (65), Tennessee (41), Georgia (33), Florida (3), Illinois (1), Indiana (1), Minnesota (1), Mississippi (1), Ohio (8), and Virginia (2).

Those who have become ill from e. coli contamination report that they ate ground beef both at home and in restaurants. The raw ground beef products recalled by K2D Foods were distributed to restaurants. The CDC, FDA, and local health official are continuing to conduct traceback investigations that will help them determine where and when people became ill.

The number of illnesses has grown by 47 since the CDC’s last report on April 12, 2019. Individual states are investigating additional illnesses that might be a part of this outbreak. Illnesses that have been reported started between March 1, 2019, and April 7, 2019. Officials anticipate that the number will continue to grow as more people seek medical attention for their e. coli related illnesses.

To speak to an E. coli Lawsuit Lawyer, to file an E. coli Lawsuit or discuss this or other E. coli Outbreaks, call 1-888-335-4901.

E. Coli Lawsuit Lawyer: Raw ground beef recalled – possible link to e. coli outbreak

Approximately 113,424 pounds of raw ground beef products that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) cautions may be linked to the growing e. coli outbreak has been recalled because it is potentially contaminated with that same e. coli. The FDA advises that it is continuing to investigate to determine the source of the growing number of illnesses across ten states; however, ground beef has been cited as a potential cause for the e. coli outbreak.

K2D Foods, which does business as Colorado Premium Foods, has recalled the approximately 113,424 pounds of raw ground beef products that were produced on March 26, March 29, April 2, April 5, April 10, and April 12, 2019. Colorado Premium Foods is based in Carrolton, Georgia. The state of Georgia has been one of the hardest hit in the e. coli outbreak, with 33 people illnesses reported at last count.

The company has recalled products shipped in two 24-lb. vacuum-packed packages in cardboard boxes containing raw “GROUND BEEF PUCK” with “Use Thru” dates of 4/14/19, 4/17/19, 4/20/19, 4/23/19, 4/28/19, and 4/30/19.  The products were shipped to distributors in Ft. Orange, Florida, and Norcross, Georgia. Those distributors then sent the potentially contaminated raw ground beef products to restaurants.

The United States Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Tennessee Department of Health have been investigating an outbreak of E. coli O103. Unopened, intact ground beef collected as part of the ongoing investigation from a restaurant location where multiple people who became ill reported dining have tested positive for E. coli O103.

Many clinical laboratories do not test for non-O157 STEC, such as O103 because it is harder to identify than STEC O157:H7. People can become ill from STECs 2–8 days (average of 3–4 days) after exposure to the organism.

FSIS is concerned that some product may be in refrigerators or freezers of restaurants. Restaurants that have purchased these products are urged not to serve them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

For more information about E. coli, E. coli outbreaks and recalls, or to speak to an E. coli lawyer, call 1-888-335-4901.

E. Coli Lawyer Ron Simon:  “The Key to the source is Georgia’s 27 E. coli victims. E. Coli numbers have been rising in Georgia as more and more victims are identified in the E. coli Raw Beef Outbreak.  It is likley that Georgia will be the first to identify the source.”

Georgia has become one of the hardest hit states in the multi-state e. coli outbreak that has sickened over 100 people. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) continues to investigate the outbreak but has determined that the probable source of the e. coli infections is ground beef. No specific brand or producer of the contaminated ground beef has yet been pinpointed.

There are now 27 reports of illnesses in Georgia related to e. coli in ground beef, with 3 Georgians being hospitalized for their symptoms. Kentucky has the highest number of illnesses, with 54, and Tennessee is reporting 28 illnesses linked to e. coli in ground beef.

The outbreak began in March 2019 and has expanded to include six bordering states: Georgia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia, Ohio, and Indiana. The CDC has found, through its interviews with those who have become ill, that consumers who became sick during the outbreak ate ground beef at home and in restaurants. Investigators are still trying to determine the source of the ground beef supplied to those grocery stores and restaurant locations connected to the people who became ill.

The CDC also anticipates that the number of illnesses will increase. It typically takes about two or three weeks between the time an infected consumer seeks medical attention and the time the case is reported to health officials.

Even with the multiple illnesses across six states, the CDC is not recommending that consumers avoid eating ground beef at this time. Nor is the agency recommending that retailers stop serving or selling ground beef. Consumers and food preparers in restaurants are advised to handle ground beef safely and to cook it thoroughly to avoid foodborne illness.

E. coli Beef Attorney Update: E. coli outbreak spreads to Indiana

Indiana has been added to the list of states affected by a beef e. coli outbreak that began in early March of 2019. The beef e. coli outbreak has been linked to contaminated ground beef, although a specific source has not yet been identified according to E. coli Beef Lawyer Ron Simon, this is likely to change in the very near future.

On April 12, 2019, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) added Indiana to the states in the region with reports of illnesses from e. coli contamination, joining Kentucky, Georgia, Ohio, Virginia, and Tennesssee. Because it is a multi-state outbreak, the CDC has taken the lead in the epidemiological investigation. As E.coli lawyer Tony Coveny explains:

“Anytime you have an outbreak that crosses state lines, like in a criminal case such as a kidnapping where the FBI is brought in, the outbreak becomes a federal matter and the CDC assumes control.  They still work primarily through the local health agencies which, of course, report to each state health agency.   The local health departments provide the boots on the ground and usually the key to an outbreak is uncovered by one of those agencies.  It is an effective system with one caveat – the time form infection to reporting to testing to including a victim in the official numbers at the CDC can lag for weeks due to the number of intervening entities.   Nonetheless, the United States is well respected for its ability to track an outbreak, and the network of health departments, especially including the tools like PulseNet, is the most efficient system on the planet.”

According to local reports, at least one person in Indiana has become ill from contaminated ground beef to date, though there is scant information on whether they purchased and consumed the beef in Indiana or a neighboring state. The CDC emphasizes that the count of illnesses generally increases as more consumers seek medical assistance. The process typically takes 2-3 weeks from the time someone becomes ill to the time the CDC receives the report from the healthcare professional. Seventeen people have been hospitalized because of the severity of their e. coli symptoms.

Investigations into the source of the e. coli contamination began at the end of March, when a number of illnesses were reported in Kentucky and Georgia. As noted by E. coli lawyer Coveny above, the outbreak then became a federal matter when it spread to neighboring states, including Tennessee, Ohio, and Virginia. Indiana was only added when the Indiana resident’s illness was identified as e. coli O103, the same strain as the outbreak, and that contamination was traced to ground beef.

Kentucky is experiencing the highest number of illnesses, with 54 reported as of April 12, 2019. (At least three of the Kentucky victims have contacted the e. coli beef attorneys s at Ron Simon & Associates so far, even though it is a bit premature to file a beef e. coli lawsuit at this time.)  Tennessee has 28 reported cases of e. coli contamination, while Georgia has 17, Ohio has 7, and Virginia has 2. As of the April 12, 2019, report from the CDC, no common supplier, distributor, or brand of ground beef has been identified.

To speak to one of the beef e. coli lawyers at Ron Sion & Associates, or to discuss a beef e. coli lawsuit, call 1-888-335-4901.

 

Source of Salmonella Outbreak: Pre-Cut Melon

Pre-cut melons from Caito Foods LLC have been recalled. According to the FDA, these pre-cut melons were sold in retail stores in 16 states including Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, West Virginia, and Wisconsin (FDA).

The contaminated melons from the Indianapolis-based company Caito Foods LLC included cantaloupe, honeydew, watermelon, and assortment melon/fruit mixes. The products are packaged in clear, plastic clamshell containers.

Because the retailer who sells the potentially contaminated melons is independent, you need to look at the label description on the back packaging of the packaged melons to identify the brand information (whether or not the container of pre-cut melons were from Caito Foods LLC).

If you purchased pre-cut melons from Caito Foods LLC recently, do not consume the melons and dispose of the package of pre-cut melons immediately. After disposing of the potentially contaminated pre-cut melons, it is a good idea to give your refrigerator a thorough cleaning. Here is a link from the Center of Disease Control explaining how to clean your refrigerator after a food recall, like this recent recall on pre-cut melons: https://www.cdc.gov/foodsafety/communication/clean-refrigerator-steps.html

If you think you got sick from eating contaminated pre-cut melon, contact your healthcare provider immediately. The contamination of the pre-cut melons is attributed to the foodborne bacteria Salmonella Carrau.

Salmonellosis is an infection from Salmonella affecting the intestinal tract. Ingesting food contaminated with Salmonella can result in severe illnesses including “arterial infections (i.e., infected aneurysms), endocarditis and arthritis” (FDA).

According to the Mayo Clinic, here are the symptoms of an infection from Salmonella:

For more information about salmonella infections, visit the Mayo Clinic’s webpage here: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/salmonella/symptoms-causes/syc-20355329

Caito Foods Melon Salmonella Outbreak: Two Minnesota Children Acquire Salmonella 

A salmonella outbreak attributed to pre-cut melons produced by Caito Foods has affected three people in Minnesota, two of whom are children living in the same household. The third person to become ill after eating the contaminated melons is an unidentified adult. The three people became ill in March.

The Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) and Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA), along with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and several other states are investigating the salmonella outbreak. The CDC and FDA have identified a multi-state outbreak of Salmonella Carrau infections linked to consumption of pre-cut melon supplied by Caito Foods, LLC, of Indianapolis, Indiana.

The three people in Minnesota who became ill had eaten pre-cut cantaloupe purchased from one Trader Joe’s store. That cantaloupe was part of the recall initiated by Caito Foods in several states, including Minnesota, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Missouri, Nebraska, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, West Virginia, and Wisconsin.

Health officials expect the number of illnesses, currently at 93, to increase as more cases are reported. It typically takes 2-3 weeks for reports of illnesses to be recorded after the victim seeks medical help.

Caito Foods has recalled fresh cut watermelon, fresh cut honeydew melon, fresh cut cantaloupe, and fresh cut mixed fruit containing one of these melons, produced at the Caito Foods facility in Indianapolis, Indiana, because of their potential to be contaminated with Salmonella Carrau.

 

Beef E. coli Lawyer: E. coli outbreak count rises to 109, ground beef probable cause

The multi-state outbreak of e. coli has sickened 109 people in 6 states, as of April 12, 2019. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that those who have become ill as part of the e. coli outbreak range in age from less than 1 year to 83 years. The CDC expects that the number of illnesses may increase, as illnesses that occurred after March 20, 2019, may not be reported yet. Seventeen of the affected consumers have been hospitalized for their illnesses.

The CDC has also narrowed down the source of the illnesses to ground beef consumed by the victims. A survey conducted as part of the investigation found that 84% of the people interviewed reported eating ground beef before becoming ill. They bought or ate ground beef from several different restaurants and grocery stores, where they bought large trays or chubs of ground beef to be used in making dishes at home, including spaghetti sauce and sloppy joes.

Beef Lawsuit lawyer

Food Poisoning Lawyer Tony Coveny, PhD is a food safety lawyer, author and commentator. He works with National Food Safety Lawyer Ron Simon.

No one producer or brand of ground beef has yet been identified though according to E. coli lawyer Ron Simon, “this is likely to be remedied shortly.” The CDC and state health officials are conducting traceback investigations to determine the supplier source. Kentucky has been the hardest hit by the e. coli outbreak, with 54 illnesses reported. Other states affected are Indiana (1), Georgia (17), Ohio (7), Tennessee (28), and Virginia (2).

Until further information is gathered about the beef e. coli outbreak, and a specific source is identified, the CDC is not recommending that consumers avoid eating ground beef at this time – though the beef e. coli lawsuit lawyers at Ron Simon & Associates do advocate those with weakened immune systems, the elderly and very young, may want to avoid such meals, especially eating out, and at home only eat thoroughly cooked and properly prepared beef  which is cooked to an internal temperature of at least 165 degrees.  The CDC always recommends consumers and restaurants handle ground beef safely and cook it thoroughly to avoid foodborne illness.

To speak to E. coli lawsuit lawyer Ron Simon, or any of the e. coli lawyers at Ron Simon & Associates, call 1-888-3335-4901.

Melon Salmonella Lawyer: Caito Foods once again recalls melons for salmonella

Less than a year after contaminated melon produced and distributed by Caito Foods sickened a number of consumers because of salmonella contamination, the company is once again recalling melons, including fresh cut watermelon, fresh cut honeydew melon, fresh cut cantaloupe, and fresh cut mixed fruit containing one of these melons. The recalled melons, produced at the company’s Indianapolis facility, are potentially contaminated with salmonella.  According to Melon Salmonella Lawyer Ron Simon. “This is the second time in as many years that we have seen a major recall and salmonella outbreak linked to pre-cut melons.”

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are investigating at least 93 illnesses that are linked to the salmonella found in the Caito Foods melons. Caito has temporarily suspended the production and distribution of the recalled melon products while the investigation continues.

 

Melon Salmonella Lawsuit lawyer

Listeria Lawyer Tony Coveny, PhD is a food safety lawyer, author and commentator. He works with National Food Safety Lawyer Ron Simon.

Melon Salmonella Lawyer Investigates as Outbreak Hits  16 States

Recalled melons that are potentially contaminated with salmonella were distributed to stores in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. The melons were packaged in clear, plastic clamshell containers.

Stores that received the potentially contaminated melons and that may still have them on their shelves include Kroger, Target, Walmart, Trader Joe’s, and Whole Foods. Recalled products include watermelon chunks, cantaloupe chunks, honeydew chunks, seasonal fruit salad, fruit spear assorted, melon mix, watermelon spears, fruit snack tray, and fruit mix.

Consumers who have these melon products in their homes should not eat them but should dispose of them properly. Salmonella contamination can cause consumers to experience fever, diarrhea (which may be bloody), nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses such as arterial infections (i.e., infected aneurysms), endocarditis and arthritis.

To speak to melon salmonella lawyer, or to discuss a salmonella lawsuit, call the melon salmonella lawyers at Ron Simon & Associates at 1-888-335-4901.

Listeria Attorney: Ready-to-eat wraps and salads recalled for possible listeria

According to federal health and regulatory officials, approximately 3,329 pounds of ready-to-eat meat and poultry wrap and salad products may be contaminated with listeria monocytogenes. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) notified the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) that routine testing of the product processing area was confirmed as being positive for the presence of listeria monocytogenes.

As a result, the company, Great American Marketing, Inc., based in Houston, Texas, has recalled the ready-to-eat wraps and salads.  Ironically, says national Listeria Attorney Ron Simon: “Their offices are only a short drive from our main office in Houston.  Usually we need to travel to locations in other states or even other countries, but food poisoning can pop up anywhere that safe food handling procedures and good manufacturing practices are not adhered to strictly.  The last major recall for listeria, centered in Texas, was the ice cream recall in which a number of listeria victims died.”

Listeria Lawsuit lawyer

Listeria Lawyer Tony Coveny, PhD is a food safety lawyer, author and commentator. He works with National Food Safety Lawyer Ron Simon.

Potentially contaminated ready-to-eat meat and poultry wraps and salads were produced by Great American Marketing from March 27, 2019, through April 8, 2019, and shipped to retail locations throughout Texas. Consumers who have these products at home should not eat them but should dispose of them properly or return them to the place of purchase.

According to Listeria attorney Ron Simon, the meat and poultry products include at least the following, though more products may yet be added to the list of implicated products:

The ready-to-eat meat and poultry wraps and salads were produced by Great American Marketing being recalled have, printed inside the USDA mark of inspection an establishment number (used to track the source of a product) that reads either “EST. 31680” or “P-31680”.

Consumption of food contaminated with listeria monocytogenes can cause listeriosis, which can cause fever, muscle aches, headache, stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance and convulsions sometimes preceded by diarrhea or other gastrointestinal symptoms. An invasive infection spreads beyond the gastrointestinal tract.  In addition, serious and sometimes fatal infections can occur in older adults and persons with weakened immune systems.

Special Warning to Pregnant Moms about Listeria:

Listeria in pregnant women, the infection can cause miscarriages, stillbirths, premature delivery or life-threatening infection of the newborn.

For more information about the Great American Marketing recall of meat and poultry wraps and salad items, to speak to a Listeria Attorney directly, or to discuss a listeria lawsuit, call 1-888-335-4901.

Multi-state e. coli outbreak numbers increase – source still unknown

An e. coli outbreak that began in Kentucky has spread to multiple states, with the number of illnesses and hospitalizations increasing. Eight people have now been hospitalized for e. coli contamination. Across 5 states, 72 people have been infected with an outbreak strain of e. coli O103. Additional illnesses are expected to be reported as the investigation continues. As of NOW, according to the experienced e. coli lawyers at Ron Simon & Associates, no source has been found, but that is very likely to change.

As such, the experienced e. coli lawyers at Ron Simon & Associates are already drafting the lawsuits for victims in the e. coli O103 outbreak. As experienced e. coli lawyers, they know that the CDC, state and local health agencies will eventually trace the source and that litigation of behalf of so many injured victims will be necessary to compensate the victims and prevent this form happening again.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration are investigating the e. coli outbreak. Health officials from five states are also participating in the ongoing investigation.

Illnesses have been reported in Georgia (8), Kentucky (36), Ohio (5), Tennessee (21), and Virginia (2). Although initially the outbreak was thought to be related to food distribution, possibly fast food, a specific food item, grocery store, or restaurant chain has not been identified as the source of infections. This, says experienced e. coli lawyer Tony Coveny, PhD, is not that uncommon: “In many outbreaks that Ron Simon and I have handled, the source is not identified until long into the investigation. This is because finding the source is a matter of using statistically analysis and traceback investigations, which take a lot of data. Each newly reported illness is yet another data point that enable researchers and investigators to trace the source of the E. coli O103.”

Reported illnesses related to the e. coli outbreak began between March 2, 2019, and March 29, 2019. Although the people who have become ill range in age from 1 to 74 years, the median age is 17. Initial reports pointed to younger people and teenagers as the majority of e. coli victims. State and local public health officials are interviewing ill people to determine what they ate and other exposures in the week before their illness started.

At this time, the CDC is not recommending that consumers avoid any particular food. Restaurants and retailers are not advised to avoid serving or selling any particular food as yet. However, that may change as the investigation continues and the potential source of the e. coli is identified.

For more information about e. coli, about an e. coli lawsuit or to speak to an experienced e. coli lawyer, call 1-888-335-4901.

The Food Safety Blog Recent Outbreaks and Recalls Across the United States