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Berry Hepatitis A Lawyer Update: Costco and Kroger Recall Berries

Home / Berry Hepatitis A Lawyer Update: Costco and Kroger Recall Berries

Berry Hepatitis A Lawyer Update: Costco frozen berries pose health risk for consumers

Just this week Kroger Company issued an important recall of its Private Selection Frozen Triple Berry Medley (48 oz), Private Selection Frozen Triple Berry Medley (16 oz), and Private Selection Frozen Blackberries (16 oz) because of potential hepatitis A contamination.  These products are from Townsend Farms, which has been previously identified as a source of a massive Hepatitis A outbreak. Now, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a health alert for the Kroger brand berries.

But now, according to Berry Hepatitis A Lawyer Ron Simon, the recall is affecting Costco, who has issued its own recall due to the potential contamination of its berries with Hepatitis A. Costco’s Kirkland Signature brand Three Berry Blend has been recalled as the berry product is also potentially contaminated with hepatitis A. Three Berry Blend is sold by Costco in California and Hawaii in 4-pound bags labeled with best by dates between February 16, 2020 and May 4, 2020. Consumers are warned not to eat either the recalled Costco berries or the recalled Kroger berries.

Potentially contaminated Kroger brand berries include:

  • Private Selection Frozen Triple Berry Medley, 48 Oz (Best By: 07-07-20; UPC: 0001111079120);
  • Private Selection Frozen Triple Berry Medley, 16 Oz (Best By: 06-19-20; UPC: 0001111087808);
  • Private Selection Frozen Blackberries, 16 Oz (Best By: 06-19-20, 07-02-20; UPC: 0001111087809)

According to Berry Hepatitis A Lawyer Ron Simon, the source of the hepatitis A contamination of these berry blends appears to be in the blackberries contained in each. The FDA is investigating the situation and has found that the blackberries for Costco’s berry blends and for Kroger’s frozen berry products came from the same supplier.

Hepatitis A virus (HAV) can result in a liver infection that may be inapparent. However, when symptoms occur, they can range in severity from a mild illness lasting a few weeks to a severe illness lasting several months. HAV is found in the stool and blood of people who are infected. HAV is spread when someone ingests the virus, usually through person-to-person contact or from eating contaminated food or drink. Contamination of food with the hepatitis A virus can happen at any point: growing, harvesting, processing, handling, and even after cooking.

For more information about the Costco and Kroger recall of berries, or to speak to a Berry Hepatitis A Lawyer, call 1-888-335-4901.

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